Day 62! The Black Hills of Dakota (Part 1)

So, with this post we will be all up to date, hooray!

We awoke to a lovely hot sunny day in the Black Hills of Dakota and set off to see the Mount Rushmore National Monument.

Mt Rushmore

Mt. Rushmore

The hordes at Mt. Rushmore

The hordes at Mt. Rushmore

Mt. Rushmore

Mt. Rushmore

Us in fron to Mt. Rushmore

Us in fron to Mt. Rushmore

Fort Hays from Dances with Wolves

Fort Hays (Major Fainborough’s office) from Dances with Wolves

Sandra in the office of Major Famborough

Sandra in the office of Major Fainborough

Major Fainborough's office

Major Fainborough’s office

The bullet hole in the window pane where Major Fainborough shot himself!

The bullet hole in the window pane where Major Fainborough shot himself!

The Rope Shop at Fort Hays

The Rope Shop at Fort Hays

A coffin at Fort Hays!

A coffin at Fort Hays!

Welcome to Deadwood

Welcome to Deadwood

Bill Hickok's Bar & Steakhouse

Bill Hickok’s Bar & Steakhouse

More of those mail boxes!

More of those mail boxes I was talking about yesterday!

Mount Rushmore National Monument is a sculpture carved into the granite face of Mount Rushmore near Keystone, South Dakota. Sculpted by Danish-American Gutzon Borglum and his son, Lincoln Borglum.  Mount Rushmore features 60-foot (18 m) sculptures of the heads of four United States presidents: George Washington (1732–1799), Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826), Theodore Roosevelt (1858–1919) and Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865).] The entire memorial covers 1,278.45 acres (5.17 km2) and is 5,725 feet (1,745 m) above sea level.

South Dakota historian Doane Robinson is credited with conceiving the idea of carving the likenesses of famous people into the Black Hills region of South Dakota in order to promote tourism in the region.

Robinson wanted it to feature western heroes like Lewis and Clark, Red Cloud and Buffalo Bill Cody but Borglum decided the sculpture should have a more national focus, and chose the four presidents whose likenesses would be carved into the mountain. The memorial began in 1927, and the presidents’ faces were completed between 1934 and 1939. Upon Gutzon Borglum’s death in March 1941, his son Lincoln Borglum became sculptor in charge of the commission and the last drilling was done on  October 31st 1941.

Some of you know that I like my films (movies) so you can imagine how surprised I was today when we were driving down to Mount Rushmore and there on the side of the road was a sign advertising a Dances with Wolves movie site!! Further investigation was required.

On the site there are the buildings that were used in the filming of the Fort Hays scenes in the film. The scenes were actually shot using these buildings sixteen miles away and were supposed to have been torn down after filming was completed but the production company just left them. Someone local bought them and moved them to their current location, had them rebuilt as they were, including the bullet hole in a pane of glass. They have photographs of the shoot, scenes from the movie showing and a behind-the-scenes DVD with Kevin Costner talking about making the film.

There’s a yellow piece of tape on the floor where Kevin Costner stood when shooting the scene where he first went to Fort Hays and spoke to Major Fainborough about a posting and who subsequently shot himself. Of course, I had to stand on that piece of yellow tape!

After that we went to visit Deadwood. The town attained notoriety for the murder of Wild Bill Hickok and the local cemetery remains the final resting place of Hickok and Calamity Jane.  Deadwood became known for its wild and almost lawless reputation, during which time murder was common, and punishment for murders not always fair and impartial.

6 thoughts on “Day 62! The Black Hills of Dakota (Part 1)

  1. that’s so fantastic! first of all Mt. Rushmore…amazing! I would love to see it in person!! Then the added bonus of scenes from Dances With Wolves!! YAY!! How exciting! Love it all!

    Like

  2. Amazing pictures especially the ones from ynp. Must be brilliant for you both to actually witness this live. Loved little house on the Prairie cabin. Many thanks for sharing your experiences, its very interesting to read. Continue to have a good time xxx

    Like

  3. What an awesome photo of the two of you in front of Mt. Rushmore. I can’t comment on “Dances With Wolves.” I never saw the movie. The pictures are cool though!

    Like

    • Thanks Dot. We always try to find someone who looks as though they could take a good photo, they are usually carrying a good camera. You may like Dances with Wolves, it’s not a totally sad ending.

      Like

Please feel free to leave a message/comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s