Day 9! Acadia National Park

So, after a lovely breakfast of fresh fruit, blueberry pancakes and bacon we set off for day one of our adventures in Acadia National Park. Our B&B is literally on the edge of the Park so not too far for us to travel.

The day started cloudy but not too bad but thunderstorms were forecast for later. Not quite as nice as the weather you are all having back home!! Luckily, we are carrying most of our home in the back of our vehicle so we are prepared for all weathers!!

Now for a little history …………….

Acadia National Park was originally created as Lafayette National Park in 1919 but was renamed in 1929.  It is the oldest National Park east of the Mississippi River.

The area was originally inhabited by the Wabanaki people. While he was sailing down the coast of what is now Maine in the fall of 1604, that well know chap, Samuel de Champlain observed a large inshore island. He wrote:

“That same day we also passed near an island about four or five leagues [19 to 24 km] in length, off which we were almost lost on a little rock, level with the surface of the water, which made a hole in our pinnace close to the keel. The distance from this island to the mainland on the north is not a hundred paces. It is very high and cleft in places, giving it the appearance from the sea of seven or eight mountains one alongside the other. The tops of them are bare of trees, because there is nothing there but rocks. The woods consist only of pines, firs, and birches.” He named it Mount Desert island.

Over four centuries later, the area remains essentially the same.

Looking back at Sand Beach

Looking back at Sand Beach

Unlike Yellowstone, Yosemite etc we are told there are no ‘wild’ beasts to be found here ……… however we have been told that we may be able to see some beaver …………. so watch this space! Today we visited Otter Cove but alas didn’t see any. There is a place called Seal Harbour so perhaps we will have some luck there later in the week. Even though there’s a lack of creature sightings the Park does not disappoint and is very beautiful, very green with some dramatic coastline.

Acadia Sea Shore

Acadia Sea Shore

 

Otter Cove

Otter Cove

 

 

 

 

 

We drove up to the top of Cadillac Mountain and passed many cyclists breathlessly making their way to the top, it’s 1530 feet (466 metres) above sea level. When we reached the top it was blowing a hooley and was very cold. I expect some of you are asking why Si didn’t hire a bike and cycle to the top just like those other brave souls …. I did ask that question myself but sadly am unable to print his reply!!!!!

Us two on top of Cadillac Mountain

Us two on top of Cadillac Mountain

This afternoon it did start to rain but no thunderstorm yet but it should clear by late afternoon. Lucky for us we were ensconced in a restaurant having lunch when the bad weather hit.

Sand at Acadia Sea Shore

Sand at Acadia Sea Shore

 

 

 

Si at Acadia Sea Shore

Si at Acadia Sea Shore

 

 

 

 

 

Jerry our host here at the B&B was telling us this morning about Popovers! Well, we thought they sound familiar and guess what, they turn out to be basically our Yorkshire Puds but butter is added to the mixture. They bake them in either muffin tins or tins that make them stand up straight then eat them for afternoon tea with butter and jam!! Okay, eating cold Yorkshire Puds, may be not quite our cup of tea. They even add cheese to the mixture. However, at the restaurant this lunchtime there were loads of people doing just that. This is the description of a Popover:

‘A popover is a light, hollow roll made from an egg batter similar to that of Yorkshire pudding, typically baked in muffin tins or dedicated popover pans, which have straight-walled sides rather than angled.’

popovers-21

Perhaps I’m missing something here but I’ve never considered eating a Yorkshire Pud with jam ………….. have any of you?  I think I need to test this out on some of my friends ………. anyone free for afternoon tea?

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